Sasse: “A lot of Senators spend a lot of time telling people how they fight for the little guy. Well, here’s the chance for them to prove it.”

U.S. Senator Ben Sasse, the author of the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, issued the following statement after Majority Leader Mitch McConnell set up a vote on Sasse’s legislation to require that doctors provide care to newborns who survive botched abortions.  The vote will take place on Monday, February 25.

“I want to thank the Majority Leader for scheduling this vote so that every American can know where their Senator stands on the issue of infanticide. A lot of Senators spend a lot of time telling people how they fight for the little guy. Well, here’s the chance for them to prove it. We’re going to have a vote on the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act and everyone is going to have to put their name by their vote. It’s cowardly for a politician to say they’ll fight for the little guy but only if the little guy isn’t an actual seven-pound baby who’s fighting for life. It shouldn’t be hard to protect newborn babies – let’s pass this legislation.”

Background: 

Senator Sasse’s Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act would protect newborns that survive botched abortions by requiring appropriate care and admission to a hospital.  

Last week, Senator Sasse asked for unanimous consent to pass the legislation. Some Democrats blocked the request. 

Sasse's legislation simply requires that, when a botched abortion results in the live birth of an infant, health care practitioners must exercise the same degree of professional skill and care to protect the newborn as would be offered to any other child born alive at the same gestational age. 

Currently, federal law does not adequately protect a born child who survives an abortion. On January 22, 2019, New York repealed protections (section 4164 of the state's public health law) for an infant born alive during an abortion.

On January 30, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam endorsed infanticide while discussing an extreme late-term abortion bill being considered in the state House of Delegates. After trying to walk-back his comments, Governor Northam doubled-down on January 31, declaring "I don’t have any regrets."